Video Blogging: Beginners Guide

Video Blogging: Beginners Guide

Guide to getting started with video blogging

Why Video Blogging…

 

Video blogging or “Vlogging” has to be the top way to communicate with your online community. If you are looking to build brand awareness or just simply create a following, getting started with Vlogging gives you that opportunity to go viral.  So why start video blogging?

Youtube  has revealed that viewers spend over a billion hours a day on the site. It is also reported that over 92% of mobile video viewers share videos with others. As technology advances and our patience decreases, people are looking for ways to consume information quickly. Videos provide the visual example that blocks of text and books do not.

If you are looking to start video blogging for the purpose of building brand awareness. Vlogging gives you the opportunity to scale your brand awareness in a cost-effective and innovative manner. All you need is a camera, a good personality and content to start.

Even if you are thinking of vlogging for personal purposes, this can be a fun experience if you try it. Now that we have touched the surface of the benefits of video blogging, we can move on to the steps of getting started with video blogging.

Step One: Find Your Niche:

This step is crucial, you need to know what your vlog is going to be about. You need to know who your audience is going to be. If you already know what your niche is, then great, move on to the next step. For those of you who are barely getting your feet wet, stay here and read along.

a picture of different people
FFinding your target audience is important because you need to know how you are going to tailor your video in order to attract your targeted niche.  Top vloggers know what they are good at so they often tailor their content to be consistent with what their viewers are expecting to watch when visiting their channel. The point of this is to become your viewers go-to for when they want to know about a certain topic.

What do I mean by that? If you are doing vlog about fashion, then it would be logical to always look your best in your videos. If you are doing a vlog about reviewing products, you need to what kind of products, and what your market is expecting to find out when they are watching your videos. Whatever the case may be, you need to know how what will drive your target audience to watch your videos.

The best way to dash through the learning curve is to study the top vloggers in your niche. Study what they are doing to be at the top of the rankings. Read through their comments, see what their fanbase like. Better yet, see what the fans don’t like and see how you can improve your videos based on that feedback.

A good idea is to think the Youtube channels that you follow if you follow any. Think about why you follow them. Do they always provide valuable content? are they entertaining? Do they stay on topic? Or is it their dynamic way of recording? These are just a few of the questions to think about when you’re in the process of making your videos.

Step Two:  Equipment

You can’t vlog without a camera or microphone. At first, you may be able to get away with just your phone camera or webcam, but eventually, you will want to improve the quality of your videos. Top vloggers use quality cameras for the purpose of better quality which in return gives their videos a tone of professionalism. There is a great variety of cameras to vlog with. Choosing one can become a bit overwhelming.

Take a look at our list of Best Cameras for Video Blogging of 2018.  Do your research and read the reviews to determine if it will fit your style of recording.

Stabilization: You have to look for cameras that have image stabilization. The purpose of this is to reduce blurring associated with the motion of the camera. Some vloggers may not need this as they only record in one stable place. If your camera does not have stabilization, then you can just get a tripod.

Video Quality: Look for the video resolution. When you purchase a camera look for stamps that say 720p, 1080p and 4k. It is better to choose the highest resolution possible, this will give you an advantage over other vloggers who record in low resolution.

Microphone Input: Every camera comes with a built-in Mic however you want to choose a camera lets you connect an external mic for better audio quality.

Those are practically the key features that you have to look for when purchasing a camera. As long as the camera you purchase comes with those features, then you know you’re on the right path toward getting started with video blogging.

Step Three: Scripts

The scripts should not be something that you’re going to be reading verbatim to your audience. It should be more of a guide that keeps you on track with the topic you are going to be recording about. The point is to plan out what you are going to be discussing or reviewing in the video. In some cases, scripting is not necessary.

Step 4: Record

This is the fun part. If you’ve never had experience recording yourself, you may want to do a few takes before uploading. Do as many as you may need, what matters is high-quality content. Don’t get frustrated if the content is not perfect. There is plenty of time to grow.

Step 5: Distribute your video

Upload your content to the web. Youtube, Instagram, Facebook, Vimeo. Once you have uploaded the video its important to promote it. Promote your videos on any social media site that you are currently active on. Your followers will be your first views and if they like the video they will be more subjective to sharing. People will share content that they find valuable.

Step 6. Continued Assessment

After your video gets views and some comments. Look for feed back, see what the crowd is saying. Look for positive comments to reinforce what you are doing right and look for the negative comments, they will tell you where you need to improve. Of course, Do not worry about the trolls, nothing can make them happy. With that said, its ok to be selective with negative feedback, not all feedback is constructive.

Conclusion

So we have covered 6 steps on how to get started with video blogging. Now you know that you must have a niche and the proper equipment if you want to get started with video blogging. You also know that preparation is key and quality content is king, there is no way around it. At the same time, don’t stress too much about perfection, it is more important that you have fun with this. With time and experience, you will become a pro vlogger if you just stick to it. So don’t give up!

Viewing your PHP Settings with a phpinfo Page

Viewing your PHP Settings with a phpinfo Page

View your PHP Settings with a phpinfo Page

How to Read PHP Settings

In this tutorial, we will show you how to create a file to read what PHP version your hosting is set to, as well as output all of the PHP settings on your hosting.  We used our cPanel hosting account for this video.  To grab your own hosting, jump over to www.githosts.com for really cheap hosting – starting at $2.49/month.

PHP has many environmental variables that you are able to update as needed. For example, you may need to update your php memory_limit to prevent certain scripts from running out of memory. In order to change these values, you must first be able to see what they are. To do that, you will need to create a phpinfo page. A phpinfo page shows you all of your php environment settings.

A phpinfo page is simply a php page with the following code:

<?php phpinfo(); ?>

How to Create a phpinfo File

If you’re not familiar with how to create a phpinfo file, follow the steps below to create a phpinfo file using your File Manager.

  1. Log into your cPanel.
  2. Get ready to upload through FTP or your File Manager.
  3. Navigate to the directory you are working with. This is important because each folder can actually be set to have different php settings. In this example, we are viewing the php settings for our main domain, so we are navigating to the public_html folder.
  4. In the top menu, click New File.
  5. When prompted for the file name, enter phpinfo.php (it can actually be named anything, phpinfo.php is simply a common name for the file).
  6. Find the phpinfo.php file in your list of files (it should have automatically updated). Right click on it and choose “Edit”. If you see a “Text Editor” prompt, choose “utf-8” from the drop down list and then click “Edit”.
  7. Enter the following text:       <?php phpinfo(); ?>

    Then click Save Changes.

How to View your PHP Settings

After you have uploaded and created the file phpinfo.php, you may now visit the file in your browser.   For example, if you owned the domain example.com, you would type http://example.com/phpinfo.php.  The results should look like the picture below.

How to use this to your advantage.

If the entire reason you are reading this article, is because you have been trying to increase php settings, like memory_limit, or max_execution_time, you now have a cheat sheet that will show you live values.  

Hit ( Ctrl + f ) to search for your values.  Make the necessary changes to your .user.ini file, your php.ini file, or if you are lucky and have cPanel – literally go down to the ‘select php version’ button, and hit ‘select php options’ on the top right.  Click and edit the values and save.   

Don’t forget to kill php processes after making changes!  This is the most common mistake.  PHP needs to reset, in order for your changes to take effect.  To do this, scroll down to the software section in cPanel, click on ‘PHP Processes’, and click ‘Kill All’.  

Reload your phpinfo.php file, and check to see if the values have updated.  

Here is an article from GitHosts.com about how to change your php settings on various servers.

Build a Raspberry Pi Project Projector

Build a Raspberry Pi Project Projector

Build a Raspberry Pi Projector!

We found this project with the help of YouTuber MickMake, who has been working hard on producing a Raspberry Pi pocket projector with the Raspberry Pi Zero W.  We thought this was an amazing project, and thought you should check it out too!

    Share the love

    YouTuber Novaspirit Tech released a new video yesterday, reviewing MickMake’s Raspberry Pi Zero W pocket projector, as the video went on, we became a little obsessed with the project!

    Thank you, Novaspirit Tech, for reminding us to subscribe to MickMake. And thank you, MickMake, for this awesome project!

    The Pi Zero W pocket projector of your dreams

    In his project video, Mick goes into great detail about the tech required for the project, along with information on the PCB he’s created to make it simpler and easier for other makers to build their own version.

    The overall build consists of the $20 Raspberry Pi Zero W, a DLP2000 board, and MickMake’s homemade $4 PCB, which allows you to press-fit the projector together into a very tidy unit with the same footprint as a Raspberry Pi 3B+ — perfectly pocket-sized.

    Specs and Things

    While the projected images obviously aren’t as clear as those of high-end projectors, MickMake’s projector is definitely good enough to replace a cheap desktop display, or to help you show off your projects on the go at events such as Raspberry JamsCoolest Projects, and Maker Faire.  Because this has low power consumption, the entire unit can run off the kind of rechargeable battery pack you may already be carrying around for your mobile phone!

    In his review video, NovaSpirit Tech goes through more of the projector’s playback and spec details, and also does a series of clarity tests in various lights. So why read about it when you can watch it? Here you go:

    Build a Raspberry Pi Project Projector

    We found a phenomenal Do-it-Yourself Raspberry Pi Pocket Projector project, check here for more!

    New Raspberry PI PoE HAT

    The new Power Over Ethernet HAT for the Raspberry Pi, allows you to power your Raspberry Pi with your Ethernet cable!

    How to Format 64GB SD Card from exFAT to FAT32

    Step by step tutorial on how to format a 64GB SD Card from exFAT to FAT32

    How to Build a mini SNES – Part 4 – The Roms

    Step by step instructions, manually install RetroPie to your Raspberry Pi and include all your favorite Roms

    How to Build a mini SNES – Part 3 – The Software

    Recently, the NES Classic made a big splash. The ability to play all your old favorites on a tiny device! However, it only plays NES games, and can fit upwards of 30 games maximum on it. We would all like the ability for a device like this to play our entire library...

    How to build a Raspberry Pi into a mini SNES – Part 2 – The Building

    Recently, the NES Classic made a big splash. The ability to play all your old favorites on a tiny device! However, it only plays NES games, and can fit upwards of 30 games maximum on it. We would all like the ability for a device like this to play our entire library...

    Review: Super Tinytendo Case for Raspberry Pi

    TechSnob Review: Super Tinytendo Case for Raspberry Pi 3, 2, Model B with Large Cooling Fan During my last project, I built a SNES Raspberry Pi complete with all games, realistic controllers, and an amazing case guaranteed to give you nostalgia. The Tinytendo Case...

    How to build a Raspberry Pi Super Nintendo – Part 1 – Parts

    How to build a miniature Raspberry Pi Super Nintendo, a step by step guide.

    How to Format 64GB SD Card from exFAT to FAT32

    Why can’t I format my SD card to FAT32?

    “I have a Sandisk Ultra 64GB SD card and cannot get it to a FAT 32 format. Tried few links, no success. I am using Windows 10.  Is there any way possible to achieve this?”

     

    SD cards are a popular storage device for many different types of equipment, and range in space from a couple MB to a couple GB.  Most devices need the format of FAT32, including the Rasbperry Pi and programs ran on it, which boot from FAT32.  We built a Raspberry Pi with a 64GB SANDISK, installing Noobs on it, Raspbian and Eleclite, if you are building a similar project, you can find our instructions on our Software page.  We found windows does not let you format any device over 32MB into FAT32, which makes formatting an SD card of 64GB hard to handle.  If you have tried using CMD or command prompt to achieve this, you may have seen an error saying Windows was unable to complete the format.

     

    With Windows 10, you have an option to use this command.         format /FS:FAT32 X:
    Replace the letter X with the drive letter for the external device you wish to format and hit Enter.   

    Note – This process may take several hours.

    If you do not have Windows 10, and are on Windows 7 or a variation of it, or just don’t feel like waiting an hour or so to find out if this works or not, there are other options.

    Format 64GB SD card/USB flash drive to FAT32 with Windows GUI of fat32format.

     

    A fast, effective, and simple tool from http://www.ridgecrop.demon.co.uk/index.htm will get the job done.  There are plenty of tools out there that will format your SD card from a 64GB exFAT to FAT32, you just need to do your due diligence to find a safe one.  This technology has been around for a while, so the internet has plenty of links to programs for this.  I found many programs that all claimed to do the same thing, but my top interest was security. 

    We found a simple program referenced in multiple forums, with reviews from those forums.  We cross referenced with an internet search for that program name, and went way past the first couple pages, and did so on a couple different search engines.  The tool, fat32format, can be found at http://www.ridgecrop.demon.co.uk/index.htm?fat32format.htm.

    The program fat32format, has been deemed safe to use, we ran virus scans on it after download, and tried the program out.  It works just as advertised, it formatted my SANDISK 64GB Micro SD Card from exFAT to FAT32.   It did so in about 10 seconds.

    This program works excellent for this specific task. For anything else, 32GB and less, you may use the SD Memory Card Formatter from sdcard.org.  Just remember, it will format anything larger than 32GB as exFAT automatically, and you need a tool like the one above as a workaround.  

    How to Build a mini SNES – Part 4 – The Roms

    How to Build a mini SNES – Part 4 – The Roms

    Recently, the NES Classic made a big splash. The ability to play all your old favorites on a tiny device! However, it only plays NES games, and can fit upwards of 30 games maximum on it. We would all like the ability for a device like this to play our entire library of roms, including SNES and Sega!

    Luckily, if you buy a Raspberry Pi, know a little bit about Linux, and can use Emulators and Roms, you can build a miniature SNES! That is what I’ve based my project on. Luckily for you, I knew nothing about Raspberry Pi, or linux when I first started this project, so this tutorial will cover the steps from the beginning. So let’s get started!

    Part 1 – The Parts
    Part 2 – The Build
    Part 3 – The Software
    Part 4 – The Roms

     

    How to Install Raspbian directly to Raspberry Pi

    If you want to skip Noobs altogether, you have that option.  This method is just as easy if you are familiar with command prompt.  You can download a fresh Raspbian Image from here. The Raspbian image can be installed the same way as the RetroPie image (as described here).

    Raspbian now automatically expands the filesystem so that step is no longer necessary.

    You can check your free disk space with

        df -h
    

    /dev/root is your main partition. Then, I would recommend to update and upgrade the existing APT packages with

        sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade
    
    

    Verify Locale Settings

    Most of the install scripts will attempt to install a variety of packages and libraries that each emulator requires. These installations will fail if your system locale settings are invalid. You can easily verify this by executing locale command. A valid locale will return values set for all options.

    If any of the above configuration lines are unset (particularly LANG, LANGUAGE, and LC_ALL), you should set them before installing RetroPie. The easiest way to set each item is to use the update-locale command, such as $ sudo update-locale LC_ALL="en_US.UTF-8".

    Users can also set the local through the raspi-config tool.

    A reboot is required before these changes will be reflected by the locale command.

     

    2.  Install RetroPie

     

    What is RetroPie?

    To turn our Raspberry Pi into a true console, we need RetroPie.  This is a software built for Raspberry Pi, that powers our mini SNES.  RetroPie contains a bunch of emulators to play old games from an array of systems, including the NES, SNES, Nintendo 64, Sega Genesis, TurboGrafx-16, GameBoy, and many more.

    There are two ways, manually using command or on an SD card.  I chose manual, but will put both here.

     

    Install RetroPie Manually

     

    After that, we install the needed packages for the RetroPie setup script:

        sudo apt-get install git lsb-release
    

    Then we download the latest RetroPie setup script with

        cd
        git clone --depth=1 https://github.com/RetroPie/RetroPie-Setup.git
    

    The script is executed with

        cd RetroPie-Setup
        chmod +x retropie_setup.sh
        sudo ./retropie_setup.sh
    

    The screen should look like this then:

     

    screenshot of retro pie after install

     

     

    Install RetroPie from image on MicroSD card

    To get this up and running, you will need to install RetroPie to the Micro SD card.  If this seems too difficult, please install manually.

    !Important – When you format a MicroSD card that already has data on it, you are essentially wiping it clean.

    1. Visit This page for the latest links to the latest versions to download the image of RetroPie.  If you’re using an older Raspberry Pi, you select the Raspberry Pi 0/1. If you’re using a Raspberry Pi 3 like we are, select the download for Raspberry Pi 2/3.
    2. Download the file locally, and extract the image. If you’re on Windows, a program like winzip, or 7-Zip might be needed. If you’re a Mac user, the built-in Archive Utility will do the job just fine.
    3. Now you need to install that image (which is about 2GB) onto your microSD card. If you’re using Windows, use the Win32DiskImager to install the image on your micro SD card. Mac users can use an app called Apple Pi Baker.
    4. Grab that micro SD card and toss it in the Raspberry Pi!

    For video instructions, check out this instructional video from the RetroPie team.  For more information check out RetroPie wiki.

     

     

     

     

    The Roms

    Now that RetroPie is installed, we need to configure a controller to use it.

     

    1.  Configuring Controllers

     

    On first boot your filesystem will be expanded automatically, you will then be welcomed with the following screen- this menu will configure your controls for both Emulationstation and RetroArch Emulators:

    retropie gamepad detected

     

    After you’ve loaded RetroPie to your SD card and put it in the Pi, plug in the power adaptor and boot it up.

    Connect it to your TV set or monitor and plug in your USB controller.

    It will take a few minutes to boot up, and then you’ll be met with a configuration screen for your controller.

     

    How to add gamepad to retropie

     

    You can use your controller to navigate through the interface, which will offer access to the various emulators installed on the device.

    Now it’s time to get some games installed on the device.

     

    2.  Install Roms

     

    Basic Install >> Quick Install

    This will install the core and main packages which are equivalent to what is provided with the RetroPie SD image.

    Now, you have to copy your rom files into the ROMs directory. If you followed the steps above the main directory for all ROMs is ~/RetroPie/roms (or /home/pi/RetroPie/roms, which is the same here). In this directory there is a subdirectory for every emulated system, e.g., nes, snes, megadrive. Attention has to be taken for the extensions of the ROM files. All the information needed for each system is detailed in this wiki (see wiki home page or sidebar for systems).

     

    Copy ROMS to Raspberry Pi using FTP

    To do this, I used FTP.  Your Raspberry Pi will have an IP address, the username will be pi, and the pw is preset to raspberry.  You may choose to use Samba Shares, or SSH. I will include instructions for FTP only here.

     

    • If you don’t already have it, Download FileZilla (Client only) on your computer.  You can get this for free at this site.  https://filezilla-project.org/ 
    • If you need a video tutorial on how to use FileZilla, check out this youtube video.
    • Obtain your raspberry pi IP address.  You can do this by opening command on the raspberry pi, and typing the following command:

                                           sudo ifconfig

    • Next to the wlan0 entry (3rd paragraph usually) you will see ‘inet addr: 192.168.1.10‘   which is the IP address of the Raspberry Pi.  This may not reflect your actual IP address.   

    FileZilla pictured below with settings, instructions follow.

     

    • Open up FileZilla.  There are 4 fields total on top.  Host, username, password, and port.  
      • In HOST, type your IP address.  In this example, it would be   192.168.1.10
      • In username field, type pi 
      • In password field, type raspberry 
      • In the port, type 21.  21 is default for FTP connection.
      • Press connect. Transfer your ROMS into the correct subfolders.  For instance, if you have NES ROMS, they would go into ~/RetroPie/roms/nes/ Simply drag and drop ROMS into that folder.
      • And, YOU’RE DONE! Now it is time to test out the Roms and your new SNES.
      • Open Emulationstation, on your Raspberry Pi.
        • EmulationStation can be run from the terminal by typing emulationstation in the terminal.  

    This will simply load RetroPie and you can use your newly configured controller to navigate to the games you loaded, and start playing! 

    How to Build a mini SNES – Part 3 – The Software

    How to Build a mini SNES – Part 3 – The Software

    Recently, the NES Classic made a big splash. The ability to play all your old favorites on a tiny device! However, it only plays NES games, and can fit upwards of 30 games maximum on it. We would all like the ability for a device like this to play our entire library of roms, including SNES and Sega!

    Luckily, if you buy a Raspberry Pi, know a little bit about Linux, and can use Emulators and Roms, you can build a miniature SNES! That is what I’ve based my project on. Luckily for you, I knew nothing about Raspberry Pi, or linux when I first started this project, so this tutorial will cover the steps from the beginning. So let’s get started!

     

    Part 1 – The Parts
    Part 2 – The Build
    Part 3 – The Software
    Part 4 – The Roms

     

    The Software

    Noobs (New Out of Box Software)

    An easy Operating System installer for the Raspberry Pi

    NOOBS is designed to make it easy to select and install operating systems for the Raspberry Pi without having to worry about manually imaging your SD card.

    NOOBS is available for download on the Raspberry Pi website:  raspberrypi.org/downloads

     

    Noobs software for raspberry pi

     

    When you first boot NOOBS will format your SD card and allow you to select which OSes you want to install from a list. This OS list is automatically generated from both locally available OSes (i.e. those contained in the /os directory on disk) or those available from GitHub remote repository (network connection required).

    The NOOBS user interface contains these functionalities:

    • Install – Installs the selected OS onto your SD card.  If you change this, it will erase all other OS installed.
    • Edit Config – opens a cmd prompt that allows editing of the config file of the selected OS
    • Language Selection – Allows you to select the language to be displayed
    • Display Mode – By default, NOOBS will output over HDMI at your display’s preferred resolution, even if no HDMI display is connected.   If you do not see any output on your HDMI display or are using the composite output, press 1, 2, 3 or 4 on your keyboard to select HDMI preferred mode, HDMI safe mode, composite PAL mode or composite NTSC mode respectively.
    • Keyboard Layout Selection – Select keyboard layout to be used
    • Online Help – (Network Required) Displays Raspberry Pi Help Page
    • Exit – Quits NOOBS and reboots the Raspberry Pi into OS boot menu.

     


     

    1.  How to install NOOBS on an SD card

    Once you’ve downloaded your copy of Noobs.zip, you will want to put the contents onto a formatted SD card.  First, grab a blank SD card at least 8 GB, I used a 64 GB.

    1. MAKE SURE the SD Card is Formatted with FAT32.  You can plug insert into your computer, check properties if you don’t know.   If it is not formatted yet, you will need to format the SD card as FAT32.  (*Note – 32GB + are formatted differently)
    2. Download and extract the files from the NOOBS zip file.
    3. Put a copy of the extracted files onto the formatted SD card.  The file needs to be at the root directory of the SD card, not a subfolder.  In the event that it does extract into a folder, copy the files a level up into the root directory.
    4. Upon first boot, the “RECOVERY” FAT partition will be automatically resized to a minimum, and a list of OSes that are available to install will be displayed.
    Operating System Choice

    NOOBS is available in 2 formats:

    • NOOBS Full includes the installation files for Raspbian only.
    • NOOBS-Lite does not include any Operating System at all.
    OS Network Download

    Both versions of NOOBS allow additional Operating Systems to be downloaded from our remote repository. To do this, the Raspberry Pi must be connected to a wired network, or it can connect over Wifi using the Raspberry Pi USB wifi dongle or the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B built-in wifi (which I have picked for the project).

     

    How to Format an SD Card as FAT

    Note:  If you’re formatting an SD (or micro SD) card that has a capacity over 32GB (i.e. 64GB and above), then see the separate SDXC formatting instructions.   

    This will tell you “According to the SD specifications, any SD card larger than 32GB is an SDXC card and has to be formatted with the exFAT filesystem. This means the official SD Formatter tool will always format cards that are 64GB or larger as exFAT.”

    To format exFAT into FAT32, quickly and easily, take note here.  I have searched multiple forums for you, and found a tool that pops up again and again and again.  http://www.ridgecrop.demon.co.uk/index.htm?guiformat.htm – I did several search engine searches to make sure the forums I was currently on were not betraying me, this pops up over and over in multiple forums as THE ANSWER to format 64GB exFAT drives into a more useable FAT32.

    We tested it out, and in a matter of seconds it had formatted successfully.  We were also able to launch Noobs and Raspbian from our Raspberry Pi on a 64GB Sandisk Drive.  Both programs require instances of FAT32 to function properly.  

     

    Windows

    As a Windows user, we recommend formatting your SD card using the SD Association’s Formatting Tool, which can be downloaded from sdcard.org.  You will need to set “FORMAT SIZE A DJUSTMENT” option to “On” in the “Options” menu to make sure SD card entire volume is formatted.  Instructions for using the tool are available on the same site.

    MAC OS

    The SD Association’s Formatting Tool is also available for Mac users, although the default OS X Disk Utility is also capable of formatting the entire disk.  Which can be done by selecting the SD card volume and choose Erase with MS-DOS format.

    What’s inside the NOOBS download

     

     

     

     

     


    1)  How to Install Raspbian directly to Raspberry Pi

    If you want to skip Noobs altogether, you have that option.  This method is just as easy if you are familiar with command prompt.  You can download a fresh Raspbian Image from here. The Raspbian image can be installed the same way as the RetroPie image (as described here).

    Raspbian now automatically expands the filesystem so that step is no longer necessary.

    You can check your free disk space with

        df -h
    

    /dev/root is your main partition. Then, I would recommend to update and upgrade the existing APT packages with

        sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade
    
    

    Verify Locale Settings

    Most of the install scripts will attempt to install a variety of packages and libraries that each emulator requires. These installations will fail if your system locale settings are invalid. You can easily verify this by executing locale command. A valid locale will return values set for all options.

    If any of the above configuration lines are unset (particularly LANG, LANGUAGE, and LC_ALL), you should set them before installing RetroPie. The easiest way to set each item is to use the update-locale command, such as $ sudo update-locale LC_ALL="en_US.UTF-8".

    Users can also set the local through the raspi-config tool.

    A reboot is required before these changes will be reflected by the locale command.

     

    2.  Install RetroPie

     

    What is RetroPie?

    To turn our Raspberry Pi into a true console, we need RetroPie.  This is a software built for Raspberry Pi, that powers our mini SNES.  RetroPie contains a bunch of emulators to play old games from an array of systems, including the NES, SNES, Nintendo 64, Sega Genesis, TurboGrafx-16, GameBoy, and many more.

    There are two ways, manually using command or on an SD card.  I chose manual, but will put both here.

     

    Install RetroPie Manually

    After that, we install the needed packages for the RetroPie setup script:

        sudo apt-get install git lsb-release
    

    Then we download the latest RetroPie setup script with

        cd
        git clone --depth=1 https://github.com/RetroPie/RetroPie-Setup.git
    

    The script is executed with

        cd RetroPie-Setup
        chmod +x retropie_setup.sh
        sudo ./retropie_setup.sh
    

    The screen should look like this then:

    screenshot of retro pie after install

    retro pi install

     

     

    Install RetroPie from image on MicroSD card

    To get this up and running, you will need to install RetroPie to the Micro SD card.  If this seems too difficult, please install manually.

    !Important – When you format a MicroSD card that already has data on it, you are essentially wiping it clean.

    1. Visit This page for the latest links to the latest versions to download the image of RetroPie.  If you’re using an older Raspberry Pi, you select the Raspberry Pi 0/1. If you’re using a Raspberry Pi 3 like we are, select the download for Raspberry Pi 2/3.
    2. Download the file locally, and extract the image. If you’re on Windows, a program like winzip, or 7-Zip might be needed. If you’re a Mac user, the built-in Archive Utility will do the job just fine.
    3. Now you need to install that image (which is about 2GB) onto your microSD card. If you’re using Windows, use the Win32DiskImager to install the image on your micro SD card. Mac users can use an app called Apple Pi Baker.
    4. Grab that micro SD card and toss it in the Raspberry Pi!

    For video instructions, check out this instructional video from the RetroPie team.  For more information check out RetroPie wiki.